The Real Reasons You Don’t Hear from Jeff Foxworthy

During the 1990s and early 2000s, there weren’t many comedians who enjoyed careers as successful as Jeff Foxworthy. His relatable humor about being a regular Joe, a dad, and a guy from the South endeared him to millions of fans…and so did his extremely popular “you might be a redneck” jokes. Foxworthy’s albums sold so well that he became the most successful comedy recording artist of all time, he starred in his own network sitcom, he hosted Are You Smarter Than a Fifth Grader? and he headlined the Blue Collar Comedy Tour with Bill Engvall, Larry the Cable Guy, and Ron White. Nothing lasts forever, of course, and these days, Foxworthy isn’t the white-hot king of comedy he once was, but he’s still got a huge following and keeps very busy. Here’s what he’s been up to—and you might not even be a redneck if you read the whole article.

Fans might not see Foxworthy shows or specials while flipping through the channels as much as they used to, but they can still catch a glimpse of him on TV—if they pay attention to the ads. Since 2015, Foxworthy has been the face and voice of the Golden Corral buffet chain, and in just over two years, he’s appeared in more than 20 different TV advertisements for the company. He’s also made ads for Purina animal feeds and the iScope, an iPhone attachment that allows hunters to take videos of whatever they see through their gun’s sight.

Foxworthy is among the most successful comedians ever, and even after his prime, his name can still move merchandise—like Redneck Barbecue Sauce, the product line he launched in the early 2000s. It’s legitimately good, too: in 2006, the stuff got high marks from Consumer Reports, whose critic praised its “big roasted garlic flavor” and said it “would go with just about anything.”

Foxworthy probably could’ve made a fortune with his sauce, except that it was only available online (the website is now defunct), and, as he told Bullz-Eye, production topped out at “10 or 12 bottles a month.” Nevertheless, in 2008 he parlayed his saucy success into a deal with a company called Greystar Products to create a line of Jeff Foxworthy Grillin’ Sauces. For the Foxworthy fan who likes flavored meat but lacks the inclination to work a grill, there’s also Jeff Foxworthy Beef Jerky.

Foxworthy is among the most successful comedians ever, and even after his prime, his name can still move merchandise—like Redneck Barbecue Sauce, the product line he launched in the early 2000s. It’s legitimately good, too: in 2006, the stuff got high marks from Consumer Reports, whose critic praised its “big roasted garlic flavor” and said it “would go with just about anything.”

Foxworthy probably could’ve made a fortune with his sauce, except that it was only available online (the website is now defunct), and, as he told Bullz-Eye, production topped out at “10 or 12 bottles a month.” Nevertheless, in 2008 he parlayed his saucy success into a deal with a company called Greystar Products to create a line of Jeff Foxworthy Grillin’ Sauces. For the Foxworthy fan who likes flavored meat but lacks the inclination to work a grill, there’s also Jeff Foxworthy Beef Jerky.

A stand-up comedian might not seem like the most logical choice to be on the panel of barons of industry, or “Sharks,” on ABC’s Shark Tank. But Foxworthy clearly has a head for business, as he’s participated in a variety of successful ventures. In 2010, he joined the show for two episodes, getting right down to business; according to the Shark Tank deal-tracking site Sharkalytics, he made two offers during his stint. One was a $50,000 investment for a 50 percent stake in Hydromax, a shoulder-pad mounted, impact-proof water delivery system that keeps football players hydrated

(Excerpt) Read more in: Looper

The Real Reasons You Don’t Hear from Jeff Foxworthy

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