Oscars: A Closer Look At The Results That Were Overshadowed By The Best Picture Confusion

It’s early Monday morning, and I’m finally back at my desk and starting to process what I witnessed only a few hours ago, but one thing’s for sure: Bonnie and Clyde ended better for Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway than the 89th Oscars did.

When the two Hollywood legends took the stage to present best picture — something that I reported was going to take place — and Dunaway shouted the name “La La Land,” the storyline for the evening seemed like it couldn’t be more positive for the Academy. Jimmy Kimmel, who ABC had persuaded the organization and Oscars producers Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd to hire as host, had aced his job, evoking laughs in a cool manner reminiscent of Bob Hope. While the Academy had to contend with the #OscarsSoWhite controversy for the past two years, two of the four acting Oscars went to black performers (Moonlight‘s Mahershala Ali and FencesViola Davis), and Moonlight‘s black screenwriters (Barry Jenkins and Tarell Alvin McCraney) won best adapted screenplay. And La La Land, an original musical that celebrates Hollywood’s artists and dreamers, which had been recognized with a record-tying 14 Oscar nominations and six other Oscars, had just won best picture.

Until it didn’t.

More Details @ The Hollywood Reporter

 

Oscars: A Closer Look At The Results That Were Overshadowed By The Best Picture Confusion

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